Family Feuds: Our Daughters Like Pillars

The first thing you see is always the set and the Huntington Theatre’s set design continues to awe me with each new work. You get a sense of place right away and then the anticipation of the story about to take place kicks in. To put it crudely (I watched a lot of tv during the pandemic), Our Daughters Like Pillars story is Real Housewives of somewhere meets Modern Family meets Maine Cabin Masters meets Socrates. There is family drama, keeping up with the Joneses, humour, sisterhood, and some pretty deep thoughts and reveals about family dynamics. Our Daughters Like Pillars is long at 3 hours and 20 minutes with two intermissions, but like, binge watching your favourite show, it flies by.

Lyndsay Allyn Cox, Arie Thompson and Nikkole Salter in The Huntington’s production of Our Daughters, Like Pillars by Kirsten Greenidge; now through May 8 at the Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA, and available digitally through May 22 on huntingtontheatre.org. Photo: T Charles Erickson

In addition to the fabulous set and entertaining story lines, the actors bring each character, who will remind you of someone you know, to life. It is one of the first works where I would not be able to share which character I like the most. Our Daughters Like Pillars is a true ensemble work. While some characters were comic relief like Julian Parker as Paul whose comedic skills were stellar and others were more cryptic and philosophical like Lizan Mitchell as Yvonne they were equally impactful to the story and on the audience members individually.

Cheryl D. Singleton and Lizan Mitchell in The Huntington’s production of Our Daughters, Like Pillars by Kirsten Greenidge; now through May 8 at the Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA, and available digitally through May 22 on huntingtontheatre.org. Photo: T Charles Erickson

Our Daughters Like Pillars will have you laughing out loud, but you will have moments that sting as well —especially if you have sisters, siblings or any sort of family dynamics. It is a reflection on family, sisterhood, and reading the fine print of life. It is a reminder that things are never as they seem. The talented cast of Daughters Like Pillars has you belly laughing, reminiscing and questioning the things you thought you once knew.

Julian Parker and Lyndsay Allyn Cox in The Huntington’s production of Our Daughters, Like Pillars by Kirsten Greenidge; now through May 8 at the Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA, and available digitally through May 22 on huntingtontheatre.org. Photo: T Charles Erickson

Playing at the Calderwood Pavilion through May 8th, tickets for in-person performances or for a digital recording of the performance start at $25.

Season ticket packages and FlexPasses are also now on sale online, by phone at 617-266-0800 or in person at the Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA, 527 Tremont Street, in the South End

Select discounts apply:
• $10 off: season ticket holders
• $30 “35 Below” tickets for patrons 35 years old and younger (valid ID required)

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